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Thread: Seeking advice: Chrome and Crystal

  1. #1
    Junior Member Corrie's Avatar
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    Question Seeking advice: Chrome and Crystal

    Hi - I'm not a new user to SHOT, but do not use it frequently enough to stay abreast of all the new features and become an expert.

    I'm asking for your advice on rendering metal with crystal/gemstones (metal handles with crystal or semi-precious gem details).
    My attempts so far using the default 'crystal' have resulted in 'gray' or dark crystal with little resemblence to the actual material. I've tried diamond also. I've played around with the material settings, lighting, etc. but really do not know enough about it.

    The typical HDRI I use is bascially Studio 011 with the yellow removed. I mostly render in chrome or metal on a basic white 'floor' with some cast shadows and that's it.

    So - those of you who render jewelry in particular, where do you recommend I start? (I did not see a Bunkspeed tutorial on this)
    Thanks,
    CS

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    Member Jay325's Avatar
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    If you are using a material like diamond and your gem is coming out Grey the problem is your hdri. If you have rotated it a full 360 with no good results start by changing your hdri.

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    Senior Member andy's Avatar
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    corrie is right about the hdri. I just wanted to add, if you're looking down at something clear, with a white floor, it doesn't matter how many times you rotate that HDRI. You're going to see the floor through it, which will be grey. You might need to float your objects higher in the scene as well. This will allow for the object to see more of the scene through refraction, if it's a gem.
    If you aren't happy with your chrome reflection, that's pretty much straight up your hdri choice.

    If you find one that is Really close, but it's just missing one thing, you can create a plane, assign a flat white material to it, or emissive if you aren't getting enough brightness, and position it where you want that extra reflection. Or if you have a giant white reflection, you can just make that plane flat black to block out some of it. It works the same as photography, except every time you do that, you get to add 20% or so to your render time. lol I don't know why I'm laughing, that kind of sucks really.

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    Junior Member Corrie's Avatar
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    Thank you Jay and Andy, I will work with your suggestions. I'm not sure about floating my objects, however. I'm working with luxury plumbing fixtures, and that's usually in a scene with a countertop/sink, etc. But I will certainly look into another HRDI.

  5. #5
    Member Jay325's Avatar
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    Another option is to scale the hdri instead of floating your product like Andy suggests this might help warp some of the lighting coming from the hdri to where you want it. I would def try using a bunch of hdri's to see what is going to work best for your needs.

    Can you include a pic of what you are trying to accomplish? This would help us help you

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    Administrator david.randle's Avatar
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    Please don't forget guys that the scale of the model/part has an affect on transparent materials in Bunkspeed. The material parameter for "thickness" refers to the actual thickness of the part which you are applying the material to in the scene. For example, if you have a glass cube in real life that is 10cm and want to recreate that correctly in Bunkspeed you must do the following:

    1. Model the cube and know the scale/units that the CAD system you are using operates in.
    2. Import the cube into Bunkspeed and in the import dialog window, set the CAD import units to match the units in your CAD package. (This tells the model to import at the same scale as the CAD package you used to model the cube).
    3. Assign glass to the cube and set the thickness parameter to 100mm (10cm)

    If you set the thickness to something else, you will get incorrect effects of glass behavior such as tint (if your class is colored), refraction, caustics etc.

    I hope this helps clarify the correct usage of the thickness parameter for materials with transparency and the association of thickness with model scale.
    David Randle / General Manager / Bunkspeed

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